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PATTERN: Tri-Blend Hat 1

The hat when paired with the matching cowl! Kind of like a colourful ninja.

The hat when paired with the matching cowl! Kind of like a colourful ninja.

I’ve finally had the chance to write up the pattern for the Tri-Blend hat, the first of the tri-blend trio of patterns I’m going to be releasing! It was a bit of a pain in the butt because, as you can probably imagine, the colourwork all had to be charted and that was no small task! Ultimately I got it done and I tried to make it clear and easy to follow.

If you like this pattern please leave a comment letting me know! And if you have any questions, comments, or concerns please let me know in the comments and I will do my best to answer you as quickly as I can.

 

Be sure to subscribe to my blog (in the sidebar) to be notified when the rest of the tri-blend set patterns are released!

 


 

Based loosely on EZ’s bonnet pattern, this bonnet has been made to be comfortable, beautiful, but also extra warm and fitted. My main motivation when designing this set was to show off the beautiful saturated colours of my three yarns, but also to find the best way to shield myself from the extreme cold of Canadian winters, extreme windchill in particular.

The extra long, extra deep bonnet brim and the added length and fit in the back with the short rows ensures the hat fits snuggly against your head.

When combined with the Tri-Blend Cowl (cowl pattern to be released at a later date) they overlap perfectly for extra warms while still being comfortable. Together you have the perfect set to stay warm and block out the coldest winter winds.

The Complete Tri-Blend Set

The Complete Tri-Blend Set

Materials:

  • 200 yards of worsted weight yarn in three different colours (total 600 yards) The leftover yarn will be enough to also do the Tri-Blend Cowl and Tri-Blend mittens. (cowl and mitten patterns to be released at a later date)
  • Size 6US circular needles (ensure cable is at least 18 inches long).
  • Stitch markers Additional needle for doing the i-cord bindoff.
  • A tapestry needle or crochet hook (for finishing the ends)

 

This pattern is available on Ravelry.com, and the pattern is available for download.

Download this pattern now!


PATTERN: Kitty Bonnet

Want to make your cat the happiest cat in all the world? If you do then you probably aren’t the kind of person who makes their cat wear silly hats, and if so then move along because this is all about how to make your cat a simple (but oh so fabulous) knitted bonnet! This is basically the slightly improved version of Chickpea’s Toque. I’ve made it so that the ear holes sit flatter, made the hat more shallow so that it sits better on the kitty’s head, and I made the ties to use an icord rather than a weird garter strip. 20150514_162718

 

 

Kitty Bonnet

Pattern features holes for the kitty’s ears, and under-the-chin ties to ensure the kitty’s hat doesn’t fall off.

 

Yarn: DK weight, 10g (scrap yarn, basically)

Needles: US 6 – 4.0mm circular needles

DPNs (optional, but highly helpful for the 3 needle bind off and the icord)

 

  1. CO 40 on circular needles.
  2. Join on the round being careful not to twist.
  3. K four rounds
  4. Count out 25 stitches. From now until step 16 you will be working back and forth on ONLY these 25 stitches. The remaining 15 stitches will be left unworked until later.
  5. K 25 stitches, turn.
  6. P 25 stitches, turn.
  7. Repeat 4 and 5 four times
  8. K2tog, K 21, SSK. Turn. (23 stitches)
  9. P 23. Turn
  10. K2tog, K2tog, K until four stitches remain, SSK, SSK, turn (19 stitches)
  11. P19. Turn
  12. K2tog, K2tog, K until four stitches remain, SSK, SSK, turn (15 stitches)
  13. P15
  14. K 15
  15. Repeat 13 and 14 five times. At this point you will have something similar to what is pictured here to the right.
  16. You will now have 15 stitches that you have been working, and the 15 that you haven’t worked. Convenient, huh? Put the worked 15 stitches on one side of your circular, and the unworked 15 on your other side. Align them so that the right sides are together.
  17. Using a third needle (a DPN works great) do a 3 needle bind off (or do a Kitchener seam, or just join the two sides however you like.)
  18. Pick up and knit 3 stitches below the left ear hole. Make a simple icord that is approx 6 inches long. Repeat on right side.
  19. Clean up your ends and you’re done!

 

Add a sassy pompom to the top to make it extra fancy for the feline recipient. Or hey, you could crochet a frilly edge in a contrasting colour along the brim, because everyone knows cats LOVE frilly edges.

download the PDF of this pattern by clicking here


PATTERN: Squashy Cowl

It took me longer than I intended but my pattern for my Squashy Cowl is finally available!

Squishy, stretchy, warm, reversible, fast knit cowl using worsted weight yarn. 085This pattern is done in a basic 6×6 rib but with alternating rows of elongated knit and elongated purl stitches. The knit/purl columns remain constant, but it alternates between rows where the knit stitches are elongated with purl stitches normal, and rows where the purl stitches are elongated and knit are normal. This results in alternating blocks of puffy stitches combined with blocks of normal tighter stitches. The technique is easy to learn and easy to do and gives a huge amount of stretch to the item. When it isn’t stretched out it creates fluffy folds that make the item very warm. Knit flat and seaming the two sides together the ribs are horizontal and the stretch is vertical in the cowl, lending it to being worn as a cowl and hood pull up over the head. Knit on the round the ribs are vertical and the stretch is horizontal. This allows the cowl to be worn loosely around the neck, or stretched out and looped for extra warmth. Made wide enough and long enough this pattern could be easily adapted to work as a shoulder shrug/shoulder cosy.

 

Elongated Knit Stitch

ek – elongated knit stitch
ep – elongated purl stitch

This pattern relies upon an elongated stitch. To make an elongated knit stitch, you make a knit stitch as you would normally except for one difference: you make two wraps of the yarn instead of one. By making the extra wrap it mimics the effect if you had used a larger needle for that stitch, creating a much larger loop. Consider it like a yarn over (YO) WITHIN a stitch, rather than before or after a stitch like a normal yarn over. With a yarn over the stitch count is increased, but with an elongated stitch your stitch count never changes due to how the stitch is worked.

diagram of what each stitch type will look like and how they will appear in the cowl

Creating an Elongated stitch

Insert your working needle into the stitch knit wise, wrap the working yarn around the working needle twice, then pull the wrapped yarn through the stitch as you would in a normal knit stitch. This will result in two loops for that stitch instead of one. The extra wrap/loop is creating some slack in the yarn that will be released when you work it on the next row.

Working an Elongated stitch

How you work an enlongated stitch is key to achieving the effect. When you get to an elongated stitch you will see the yarn wrapped around the needle rather than just looped over like a normal stitch. Pick up the first loop with your working yarn, work it as the pattern indicates, but when you pull the yarn through the stitch you need to pull the extra loop off the needle as well. You are releasing the slack you created by doing the double wrap when you created the stitch, making that loop extra big.

It is important that it is worked as one to get the elongated loop.

  • Do NOT knit each loop separately. This would create extra stitches and you would not get the big elongated loop.
  • Do NOT knit the two loops together. This would keep the loop from being large and elongated.

 

The pattern is actually quite simple once you get a handle on the elongated stitch. You really just need to remember to release the elongated stitch each time you come to one. Now that I have explained the elongated stitch to death, on to the actual pattern!

 

Materials:

  • 300-400 yards of worsted weight yarn. (I used Berocco Vintage yarn)
  • Size 6 US (4mm) circular needles. (Straight needles can be used if you are making the knit flat vertical stretch version of the cowl.)

Option 1: Knit Flat/Vertical Stretch

Cast on 84 stitches using a stretchy cast on technique. This will be 8 repeats of the ribbed pattern. NOTE: If you want to make it wider/more narrow make sure your total number of stitches of a multiple of 6!

OPTIONAL SEAMLESS JOIN: For a concealed seam on the cowl cast on using a provisional cast on method. This will allow you to seam the two sides together using kitchener.

Row 1,3,5 : *(ek6, p6), repeating * 7 times

Row 2,4,6 : *(k6, ep6), repeating * 7 times

Row 7,9,11 : *(k6, ep6), repeating * 7 times

Row 8,10,12 : *(ek6, p6), repeating * 7 times

Repeat rows 1-12 until it reaches the desired length. In the pattern example 20 repeats were done.

Cast off using a stretchy cast off technique, then join the two sides together using the technique of your choice. For best results complete the seam in such a way that allows for some stretch.

 

OPTIONAL SEAMLESS JOIN: Instead of casting off pick up the stitches from the provisional cast on edge and connect the two sides of the cowl using kitchener stitch. In order to do this and have it be truly seamless you need to be able to do a kitchener stitch for both knit and purl stitches.

 

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Option 2: Knit on the round/Horizontal Stretch

Cast on 252 stitches on circular needles. Join on the round.

Row 1-6: *(ek6, p6), repeating * 21 times

Row 7-12 : *(k6, ep6), repeating * 21 times

Repeat rows 1-12 until cowl is desired length.

Cast off using stretchy cast of technique.


You can download a PDF version of this pattern by clicking HERE.


PATTERN: Striped Feather and Fan Wrap

Striped Feather and Fan

Alternating waves of awesomeness

Deceptively simple wrap, looks much harder than it actually is. Uses a basic feather and fan stitch pattern and alternating colours to add dynamic waves. Very well suited for a solid and colour gradient yarn (like one of the Kauni gradients)! Frankly this pattern is fantastic for making new-ish knitters look brilliant because it looks like it would have been difficult to do but really only uses some pretty basic skills. Bonus points for the fact that because your colour changes every 4 rows you can easily see your progress as you go along. No knitting for hours and hardly seeing any change. High fives!

Difficulty: 2/10

Impress your friends: 7/10

Skills needed: knit, purl, knit 2 together, yarn over, carrying yarn up the side

Yarn: Fingering weight, 1200 yards (600 of colour A, 600 of colour B)

Needle: 3US

 

Notes:

The colour changes every 4 rows, which is key to making this project look so cool, but weaving in all those ends? Ain’t nobody got time for dat! So instead we are going to carry the yarn up the side. Don’t worry, this isn’t hard! Here is a great video explaining this technique. Basically, when you switch colours just drop the yarn you were using and start using the new one. The only “trick” is to be sure to leave enough slack so that you don’t get any puckering or distortion along the edge. You also don’t want to leave too much slack which would leave an unsightly loop along the edge.

 

For newer knitters or for people who easily forget what number stitch they are on, I strongly suggest placing a marker every 18 stitches. While knitting this I frequently lost track of how many [YO, K] I had done. Because the feather and fan pattern ends on three K2tog I can easily just count back from the next marker and stop doing the [YO, K] when there are 6 stitches left. I find the markers also help so that any screw ups or miscounts are limited to just one repeat instead of potentially a whole row.

 

For my instructions colour A is my colour gradient yarn, colour B is the solid colour yarn.

 

Abbreviations: K = Knit     P = Purl      k2tog = Knit two stitches together    yo = Yarn over

Instructions:

Cast on 108 stitches using your first colour.

Row 1: Knit across

Row 2: Purl across

Row 3: *(K2tog) 3 times, (yo, k1) 6 times, (k2tog) 3 times; repeat this pattern 6 times. NOTE: if you opted to use stitch markers you would place them in between each repeat (after the second k2tog) and just slip the marker when you get to it.

Row 4: Knit across. Switch colours.

 

Repeat rows 1-4 until you are just about out of yarn. Make sure you end on row 4 of a repeat.

Bind off using the bind off technique of your choosing. I recommend Jenny’s Surprisingly Stretchy Bind Off. Weave in ends. Block if you feel like it. Personally I like this wrap to be squashy and unblocked, but you can block if you want. I won’t judge.


 

View my blog posts about this pattern by clicking here!